Medical Attention for a Bleeding Injury


bleeding injury

The rise in extra-deep Delta-V bleeding injury rates over the last twenty years has been particularly prominent in relatively high Delta-V landing accidents. Among the highest single injuries to occur in a Delta-V landing accident, the three aforementioned extra-deep injuries are the most common, with higher odds of severe injury to passengers age 60 and older, passengers age 70 or above, and for passengers age 80 and above.

Common Injuries

Subdural hemorrhages also called intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH), are the second most common bleeding injury occurring in a Delta-V landing accident. They occur as a result of the collapse of the interior lining of the spinal column, which is called the intervertebral discs. Intracerebral hemorrhages can cause permanent brain damage and should be immediately reported to an EMT before the flight. They are far less likely to result in Delta-V injury than intracranial hemorrhages.

Hemorrhages resulting from subdural hemorrhages occur in the outermost portion of the spinal canal, typically in the middle diencephalon, and can often result from trauma to the spine during an air crash or other type of impact. This type of bleeding can often be confused with a bulge in the inner linings of the diencephalon, and thus, a “subdural” hemorrhage can occur in the middle diencephalon. In addition to intracranial hemorrhages, there are many extra-deep hemorrhage injuries, including those caused by falling objects and injuries caused by flying debris. They can also be caused by the impact of the aircraft itself, such as the shock waves it generates, or by the impact of an object on the aircraft. The largest amount of additional spinal trauma occurs during the post-impact period following the landing when spinal tissues and muscles are torn away from their supporting structures.

The third most common Delta-V bleeding injury involves subdural hematomas (SH) that occur in the lower portion of the spinal canal. They are sometimes also mistaken for subdural hemorrhages, but cannot result in permanent damage to the spinal cord, and therefore, are considered not to be potentially life-threatening.

bleeding injury

Patients with a high chance of hemorrhoids, especially when they are larger than one-half inch in diameter, should avoid flying on Delta-V aeroplanes for the same reason. They can also avoid Delta-V aircraft altogether if they are prone to swelling of the buttocks and/or anus. or pelvic pain of the lower back.

Delta-V Injuries

One of the four most common Delta-V injuries, which are not classified as a hemorrhage per se, is a submucosal hemorrhage (SMH), a result of a break in the mucous membrane at the back of the ear. This break will cause a large amount of swelling of the eardrum, leading to difficulty hearing, pressure, and pain.

Passengers of all ages and types of aircraft must wear their seat belts at all times. All passengers must be aware that Delta-V aircraft seats are designed with a hard metal liner that may buckle, which may cause injury or even death.

Although most injuries to passengers on Delta-V flights are not life-threatening, the crew and other cabin crew members are trained to respond quickly and professionally to any emergency that may arise. Therefore, passengers who are travelling on a passenger aircraft that is involved in an accident should contact an EMT, the airline, and the airline’s medical department for assistance as soon as possible, and ensure that the correct medical treatment is immediately administered.

Self-Treatment

One should be wary of passengers who try to “self-treat” injuries at the airport and should never attempt to do so by themselves on an aeroplane. This can include aspirin, ibuprofen, oatmeal baths, hot showers, ice packs, or the use of hot or cold compresses. These methods may be very beneficial at a local hospital. However, because Delta-V flights fly over land, it may be necessary to obtain emergency medical attention right on board, with the added risk of being subjected to additional medical attention.

Medical attention for a bleeding injury on a Delta-V flight should only be sought out after the flight has been delayed, if necessary, if there is no emergency and if there is evidence of further injury. or if the severity of the injury warrants it.

It is strongly suggested that passengers seek medical attention right away. If an EMT arrives to assist the passenger and has not already treated a bleeding injury, the airline crew should notify the EMT as soon as possible and take the passenger to the next available area of the terminal, where emergency medical services are available for the flight. Once the medical staff determines that the injury is minor, the patient can be transferred to a waiting ambulance and brought to the hospital, and medical personnel there will discuss the options and what further action may be taken.

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